Teaching > RWU HP451 Senior Thesis Project (draft, version 090714)

Slated for Preservation, thesis by Allison Collins. Posted on the Web and included as part of a co-presentation and publication with Philip Marshall forThe Roofing Conference and Exposition for Historic Buildings, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 17-19, 1999.

Description

Course Number and Title

HP 451 Thesis in Historic Preservation

Credits

Three.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Senior standing and approval of faculty and Dean.

Refer to Thesis Proposal for submission.

Place/Time

TBA

Type

 Directed, in-depth study under the advisement of faculty.

Instructor

Individual faculty members.

Office Hours

Advising hours will be posted on my faculty office door each week, a week in advance. Please sign up and bring an agenda. If you plan to discuss drafts, proposals, drawings, field notes, photographs, or similar material, please leave a copy in my faculty mailbox with a note asking me to preview your work at least two days before your meeting — to provide enough time to consider carefully your work before getting together.

Catalog Description

"Serves as the cumilating academic experience for outstandign students in the major. Students work closely with a faculty supervisor in a self-defined and self-directed study of an aspect of historic preservation. Students are encouraged to select a focus which demonstrates original and critical thinking, and contributes to available scholarship. Research results are in many cases of publishable quality and/or serve as the basis for scholarly presentations to professional groups. (3 credits) Special offering
Roger Williams University, University Catalog, 2008-2009, p. 394

Course Description

Refer to catalog description.

In addifition, Honors Program students are referred to requirments of the Honors Program.

Office Hours

Advising hours will be posted on my faculty office door each week, a week in advance. Please sign up and bring an agenda. If you plan to discuss drafts, proposals, drawings, field notes, photographs, or similar material, please leave a copy in my faculty mailbox with a note asking me to preview your work at least two days before your meeting — to provide enough time to consider carefully your work before getting together.

Course Goals

Primarily, this course requires students to initiate, pursue, and successfully complete a research exercise that demonstrates ability to apply information and skills developed over four years of undergraduate education. It is a focused experience that explores in detail a particular topic in historic preservation. It typically has less of a theoretical orientation and more of a practical orientation. In some cases the work product may result in publishable material. In other cases specific work may be undertaken in conformance with established, professional standards in the field. For example, a student might conduct research to nominate a structure to the National Register of Historic Places. Most commonly, the thesis is a sustained, in-depth research project resulting in a 20-25 page paper. By arrangement with a faculty sponsor other types of projects, such as organizing an exhibition or a tour guide, may be considered a “culminating experience” equivalent to the thesis.

Course Materials

Thesis-specific material is developed by the student, under the advice of the Instructor.

Reading (under development)

Becker, Howard S. (1998). Tricks of the trade: how to think about your research while you're doing it. Chicago, Ill., University of Chicago Press. Amazon

Thomas, Robert Murray and Dale L. Brubaker. Theses and Dissertations: A Guide to Planning, Research, and Writing. Corwin Press, 2nd edition, 2007. Amazon

The Basics of Academic Writing, Dr. Kendra Gaines, Graduate Writing Resource, The University of Arizona.

How Not to Plagiarize

Sites that discuss the wrong doing of plagiarism and tells you how to avoid it. The first link includes guidelines on how to appropriately cite sources in your report. 

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~sources/about/what.html
http://webster.commnet.edu/mla/plagiarism.shtml

Citation

Citing your Resources, RWU Libraries

Style Manual Used by SAAHP

Student Participation

Refer to format, above. Students are expected to take the initiative in adhering to the schedule for completing work, attending occasional class meetings, and meeting individually with the Instructor.

Retain absolutely all records of research, correspondence (including thank-you letters to professionals who help you during your research), meetings, site visits, drafts and any other project-related material. Compile in an organized manner, for submittal with the final report.

Students are required to discuss their thesis at the end of the semester in a quasi-public presentation to fellow students, and/or practitioners and the public.

Skills

Conceptual Creating examined conceptualizations of select objects of study — i.e., theory-building.
Philosophical Becoming critically self-aware of your normative perspectives (calling into view the "philosophy of social science," including ontology and epistemology)
Methodological Applying investigative strategies to address scholarly questions.
Analytical
Unpacking a whole into its component parts; examining a complex object, its elements, and interdependences.
Communicative Building, supporting, and presenting an evidence-based position or argument.
Writing Producing a clearly written research proposal and well-documented thesis.

Evaluation (Grading Policy)  

The final grade is based on the thesis submitted. Consideration will also be given to the presentation, material compiled during your work, and the student completing the course requirements on time and in a professional manner.

Thesis Document

Thesis shall be converted to an Adobe PDF file for distribution. Two bound copies shall be printed on archival paper stock, 8-1/2" by 11".

Syllabus – Schedule of Class Meetings

Occasional class meetings, as scheduled by the Instructor. Meetings between student and Instructor are to be set up by the student.

Assignments

Varies.

NAAB Matrix

To be included.

Format

  • Regular meetings with the faculty member.
  • Use of primary and secondary sources.
  • Use of recognized, professional methods for citation and documentation.
  • Assessment of student proficiency of skills employed in the field and consideration of the skills in addressing the scope of the thesis work.
  • Thesis proposal