Techniques > Briefs > Roofing for Historic Buildings > Historic Roofing Materials in America > Metal

 

tin
Explain the method of what tin-roofing is?

http://www.monticello.org/
roof.jpg
eastfront.jpg (is this the right facade?) [Source]

Roof of Kingscote, Newport

• Examples

Tinplate Iron

Tinplate iron, commonly called "tin roofing," was used extensively in Canada in the 18th century, but it was not as common in the United States until later. Thomas Jefferson was an early advocate of tin roofing, and he installed a standingseam tin roof on "Monticello" (ca. 1770-1802). The Arch Street Meetinghouse (1804) in Philadelphia had tin shingles laid in a herringbone pattern on a "piazza" roof.

However, once rolling mills were established in this country, the low cost, light weight, and low maintenance of tin plate made it the most common roofing material. Embossed tin shingles, whose surfaces created interesting patterns, were popular throughout the country in the late 19th century. Tin roofs were kept well painted, usually red; or, as the architect A. J. Davis suggested, in a color to imitate the green patina of copper.