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Replacement

 

Match the profile of the sash and its components, as closely as possible to that of the original window.
A historic wood window has a complex profile--within its casing, the sash steps back to the plane of the glazing (glass) in several increments (see illustrations of a head and jamb section on p. 72 and 73). These increments, which individually only measure in eighths or quarters of inches, are important details. They distinguish the actual window from the surrounding plane of the wall. The profiles of wood windows allow a double-hung window, for example, to bring a rich texture to the simplest

structure. In general, it is best to replace wood windows with wood on contributing structures, especially on the primary facade. SLC

If windows must be replaced, the new windows should match the historic windows to the greatest extent possible. New windows should fit into the existing openings, match the original window type, and preserve wood casing around the sash. . .

3.0 Windows, Design Guidelines for Residential Historic Districts in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City Historic Landmark Commission, Salt Lake City Corporation, 1999.

Finally, when replacing a historic window, it is important to preserve the original casing when feasible. This trim element often conveys distinctive stylistic features associated with the historic building style and may be costly to reproduce. Many good window manufacturers today provide replacement windows that will fit exactly within historic window casings.

3.0 Windows, Design Guidelines for Residential Historic Districts in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City Historic Landmark Commission, Salt Lake City Corporation, 1999.

However, as important as old windows are, there are cases when a window must be replaced due to extreme deterioration.

In such cases you should duplicate the original exactly in number and size of panes and overall size. A two-over-two pane configuration should not be replaced with a one-over-one or a six-over six. Also, never cut down a window opening to take a smaller window.

Then we have the third and best option ASSIDE from restoring your originals. For true divided lights, look for a manufacturer that makes all-wood windows. Cedar Windows by Bergerson, for example custom-manufactures windows in rot-resistant cedar. “The wood goes all the way through and separates the window panes. That’s what true divided light means.” Divided light gives windows that sparkle.

A second option is what is called a simulated divided light, which consist of muntins that are permanently attached to the interior AND exterior panes with a durable adhesive - - a compromise for homeowners who want dual-paned windows.

Today there are alternatives for replacement windows. Most window manufactures offer at least three options: the cheapest is and it most definitely LOOKS the CHEAPEST is the snap-in, removable grille or muntins, designed to fit a sash with a single large pane of glass. DO NOT settle for fake snap-in muntins sold by most manufacturers.

 

If you do replace your windows, the best thing to do is to store the old sashes. A future owner may find them very useful.

 

Architectural fragment. Otherwise, donate one to a historical society

 

 

 

 

 

 

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