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Tenzing Bhuti

"The most important issue that I feel our community faces is that our culture and our identities are in the hands of the younger generation. "

Q. Could you tell me your nameand where you come from?

A. My name is Tenzing Bhuti and I am from New Delhi, India. I was born in Sakya, Tibet and raised in Darjeeling, India. There I attended the Central School for Tibetan in Darjeeling.

Q. How did you come to the US?

A. Well, I arrived here in the US in July of 1998. Q. What was your previous occupation and what is your present occupation? A. While in Darjeeling I worked in the Tibetan refugee self help centre as a cashier then I was a housewife back in New Delhi and at the moment I work as a nanny.

Q. Could you tell us what roles you have played in various community organizations?

A. I am currently a board member of Tibetan Woman’s Association [TWA] for the second term.

Q. What motivates you to do community work?

A. It’s just the great feeling that it provides by doing something for the community on my part.

Q. In a busy place like New York, how do you make time to handle personal, professional and community service?

A. Well, I work Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm as a nanny. For the TWA we usually make time either after work or during weekends and as for my family they have been very supportive of my commitment to the community service and understand my somewhat of a busy schedule. But in the end somehow I always manage to find the time for everything.

Q. What do you feel are some of the main issues that you feel your/ our community faces presently? What do you think some of these issues could have in the near and long term future on the community?

A. The most important issue that I feel our community faces is that our culture and our identities are in the hands of the younger generation. The younger generation needs to get more involved in the community — and not only them but the parents need to get more involved in their children’s life because they are our future. If not then there is a great possibility that our culture might get lost in the midst of the western culture. We must at all cost preserve our identity as Tibetans.